Markham & Reilly Record A Podcast!

Well we’ve been threatening to do this for YEARS and it’s finally happened. David and I recorded a new podcast! About US politics! I know, I know – some of you HATE that idea – but the good news is, you don’t have to listen to it!

However, if you DO want to hear David and I discuss the recent US government shutdown – helped by a guest,  Doug LaFollette, Secretary of State of Wisconsin – then go over to my blog. If you don’t – then don’t. There’s a TINY bit of Napoleon news at the very end of the podcast, just to keep y’all happy. Happy Battle Of Leipzig anniversary!

War Gamers Remember the Battle Of Leipzig

200 years ago, in October 1813, Napoleon lead his dwindling army into The Battle Of Leipzig. The war gamers are re-enacting it this weekend – in front of nearly 30,000 spectators, some 6,000 history buffs from across Europe will act out the battles of October 1813, which were among the bloodiest of the 19th century. Read more.

If you want more background on the battle, we discussed it in Episode #28.

3D-scanning Napoleon’s battlefield at Borodino

Image (c) Artec 3D

From the website of Artec3D:

Marking the 200th anniversary of that battle, the Russian Academy of Sciences, commissioned Artec to help with excavation and documentation of the battle field. Artec was tasked with scanning all human and battle-horse remains. The job was not for the faint-of-heart. One of our tech nearly fainted. But we persevered…

I heard about it via Skeptoid (and thanks to Mark Hellewell for bringing it to my attention) who was kind enough to give David & I get a mention:

Even though Napoleon technically won, it was far from being a decisive victory. Napoleon afterwards went on to occupy Moskou, but eventually had to retreat. This “strategic withdrawal“, as David Markham and Cameron Reilly called it in their Napoleon Bonaparte podcast, was in fact a complete disaster, resulting in the “Grande Armee” being decimated. On his way back, the troops had to pass the battlefield they had left only a few weeks earlier, and hardly any corpses had been buried. You can imagine the effect this had on the moral of the French troops and their allies.

Well it WAS a strategic withdrawal. It’s certainly not like the Russians came even close to winning a battle, let alone the war. Napoleon and his troops just decided enough was enough and it was time to return home. I don’t know what else you’d call it.

 

 

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